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Shimanami Kaido Cycling

Trouble Shooting

If you go on cycling trips, you are most likely to be forced to fix a flat tire. Tires are the parts that are most exhausted, so you should be able to troubleshoot on your own. It can be hard to find a bike shop in unknown places. Frankly, there are hardly any specialty bike shops on the islands along the Shimanami Kaido. You must be your own tech! When you ride on a sports bike, it is common to change inner tubes, rather than using a patch kit. It is best to familiarize yourself to change inner tubes beforehand.

The necessary tools

The necessary tools

For smooth trouble shooting and regular maintenance, you must have proper repair tools. You can get them a few at a time as necessary. For an emergency inner tube changing on the road, all you need is a spare inner tube, a tire lever and a mini pump. You can purchase them at specialty bike shops. Itfs likely that regular bike shops donft carry those tools for sports bikes. So make sure you keep them handy for your trip.

How to

1) Deflate the tire completely

Deflate the tire completely

Release the remaining air from your flat tire by depressing the top of the valve ( the valve must be open first). Remove the nut that screws onto the stem. By pressing down on the inner part of the valve, make a gap between the tire and the rim.

2) Insert tire levers

Insert tire levers

Ease one lever in under the wheel rim near the valve and lever out the edge of the tire with taking great care not to puncture the inner tube. Pry it up over the wheel rim and secure it against the spoke.

3) Use more tire levers if necessary

Use more tire levers if necessary

Move around the rim carefully and repeat the process with a couple more levers if necessary, placing them 10 to 15 centimeters away from the previous one.

4) Unset the tire bead

Unset the tire bead

Now a section of the tire bead (edge) is free, and you should be able to unseat the rest of the bead with your fingers.

5) Start removing the inner tube

Start removing the inner tube

Remove the inner tube from beneath the tire slowly. Handle it carefully not to damage it.

6) Take the valve out

Take the valve out

Take the valve stem out. If the valve is long, pull it straight up vertically from the rim to prevent damaging the valve.

7) Get the new tube ready

Get the new tube ready

Partially inflate the new inner tube to give it shape and ensure it holds air.

8) Insert the valve

Insert the valve

Starting with the valve stem, lower the inner tube onto the wheel, inserting the valve into the rim valve hole. Check that the valve stem is straight and not at an angle to protect both the inner tube and the opening of the valve.

9) Insert the rest of the inner tube

Insert the rest of the inner tube

Then place the rest of the inner tube inside the tire. Make sure the inner tube is placed straight.

10) Push the tire bead in

Push the tire bead in

Start pushing the tire bead inside the rim. Proceed around the wheel, working more of the tire bead inside the rim. This will get harder as you get closer towards the end. Pinch both sides of the tire in towards the center of the rim to get things going. Ideally, the job should be completed all by hand. Use caution when using a tire lever to avoid pinching the tube.

11) Check if the inner tube is not caught

Check if the inner tube is not caught

Once the bead is in place, check along to make sure that the inner tube is not caught between the rim and the tire bead as it could cause another flat. If the tube is caught, pinch both sides of the tire inward.

12) Inflate the tire

Inflate the tire

After checking the inner tube, inflate the tire a little to make it a bit firmer.

13) Check if the tire is seated straight

Check if the tire is seated straight

Go around the whole tire to see if the tire is seated straight. If the tire is crooked, it means that the inner tube is caught inside. Put the lock ring in place and inflate the tire to its recommended pressure.

©Imabari District Sightseeing Association